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Direct carbon capture: a quick guide.

Direct carbon capture

Table of Contents

The technology known as Direct Carbon Capture (DCC) captures carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air or industrial processes and stores it or uses it for other purposes. DCC is considered an essential tool in the fight against climate change, as it allows for the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere, which is a major contributor to global warming.

There are a few different DCC technologies, but Direct Air Capture (DAC) is the most commonly used. DAC works by drawing in air and passing it through a filter that absorbs the CO2. The CO2 is then released from the filter and captured. The process is then repeated, with the captured CO2 being stored or used for other purposes.

Another type of DCC technology is called post-combustion capture. This technology is used to capture CO2 from the exhaust gases of power plants and industrial facilities. The CO2 is separated from the other gases in the exhaust using various methods, such as chemical absorption or membrane separation.

One of the main advantages of DCC is that it can be deployed in a variety of settings and can capture CO2 from sources that are difficult to reach, such as industrial facilities or power plants. Additionally, DCC can be combined with other carbon capture technologies, such as those used in power plants, to create a fully integrated carbon capture and utilization solution.

One of the main challenges facing DCC is the cost of capturing CO2. The price of capturing one tonne of CO2 using DCC technology is currently higher than the cost of capturing CO2 from power plant flue gas, the most common method now used. However, as the technology and the market for captured CO2 continue to develop, it is expected that the cost of DCC will decrease.

In conclusion, Direct Carbon Capture (DCC) is a technology that captures carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air or industrial processes and stores it or uses it for other purposes. The most common type of DCC technology is Direct Air Capture (DAC), and another one is post-combustion capture. DCC has many advantages, such as its ability to be deployed in various settings and capture CO2 from difficult-to-reach sources. However, the main challenge facing DCC is the cost of capturing CO2, which needs to be lowered. But as the technology and the market for captured CO2 continue to develop, the price is expected to decrease.